Dublin’s bus rapid transport plan moving forward to design stage

Plan for high-capacity, high-frequency bus routes — known as bus rapid transport or BRT — are continuing to progress. The BRT routes likely mean large changes for cycling on the route corridors.

According to a written parliamentary reply in the name of transport minister Shane Ross, the detailed design of the Blanchardstown to UCD route will soon progress to tendering, while the the route option selection for the Clongriffin to Tallaght route will also be tendered for.

So-far indications — including the design of the apparently on-hold Swords route — are that Dublin’s BRT will be below the international standards, but the new routes could change this. The Swords route lacked key design features such as centre-of-road running.

Minister Ross said: “Funding is being made available for initial planning and design work for the Blanchardstown to UCD and Clongriffin to Tallaght BRT schemes under the Government’s Capital Plan ‘Building on Recovery Infrastructure & Capital Investment 2016-2021’. I understand from the NTA that they are currently finalising tender documents to progress the design and planning of the Blanchardstown to UCD scheme and the route option selection for the Clongriffin to Tallaght BRT scheme.”

He added: “Implementation of these schemes will be progressed on an incremental basis in accordance with available funding.”

The full parliamentary reply can be found at kildarestreet.com, it was in reply to a question by Labour TD Joan Burton.

Here’s a map outlining the originally three BRT planned routes, including the main two routes mentioned above and the Swords route, which was not mentioned in the parliamentary answer:

swiftway_overall_network_map

1 Comments

  1. If this plan is implemented, we will have a pretty decent rapid transport network: 1 Dart line, 2 Luas, 2/3 BRT. The Metro to the Airport is due for construction too. If we also develop a network of Quietway cycle routes in the suburbs, combined with the planned DublinBikes expansion, the network will be within easy reach of the majority of Dublin’s citizens.

    Unfortunately, it looks like it could take about 20 years to complete.

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