Transport authorities urged to apply for Ten-T funding for cycling projects

An expansion of the EU’s €1.9 billion Trans-European Transport Networks (Ten-T) fund to include cycling projects was again welcomed by the European Cyclists’ Federation, but the European-wide cyclists’ group said that many authorities still do not know about the cycling element of the fund.

Ten-T transport fund distributes EU funding to projects that better connect passenger and freight across a core and secondary network, and at a local level on network nodes.

IMAGE: European Cyclists' Federation are keen on promoting Ten-T as a source of funding for the Eurovelo network it oversees, although it's unclear how much of the two Irish Eurovelo routes are covered as they mainly only cross or run a long distance parallel to Ten-T routes.

IMAGE: The European Cyclists’ Federation is keen on promoting Ten-T as a source of funding for the Eurovelo cycling network (which it oversees, pictured above), although it’s unclear how much of the two Irish Eurovelo routes are covered as they mainly only cross or run a long distance parallel to Irish Ten-T routes.

Because of the lack of knowledge of the cycling elements to the Ten-T fund, a message to cycling advocates from the federation said: “We would therefore like to encourage you to contact the relevant national and regional authorities to propose that they take advantage of the opportunities available for incorporating cycling measures in their projects.”

The deadline for the submission of proposals is February 7, 2017.

The cycling projects covered now include two elements: The first element is “infrastructure dedicated to cyclists and pedestrians, such as tunnels, bypasses, bridges, aerial cycling and walkways and protected cycling paths” along Ten-T routes or at crossings between Ten-T routes and long-distance cycling paths.

The second element which covers cycling includes works, studies or deployment of pilots projects to address multi-modality (ie use of trains and bicycles), sustainably shifting from cars to softer modes (public transport, cycling, walking) and for freight or passengers shifting from fossil to alternative fuels and/or improving road safety.

The European Commision said: “This includes (not exhaustive): public transport optimisation (for example through segregated lanes), development of bikes and cargo-bikes transport patterns, alternative fuels infrastructure and/or solutions & services, low-noise and low-carbon urban freight delivery (including through transhipment facilities between long-distance and urban transport), car-sharing and ride-sharing schemes, better use of public space, etc.”

Relating to freight deliveries, an EU-funded report on cargo bicycles found that around half of all goods-related transport trips in urban areas could be switched to bicycles — the largest potential is seen to be replacing vans with cargo bicycle trips in urban centres.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: