Second South Dublin Quietway meeting planned this Wednesday

IMAGE: Bollards -- as widely used in the Netherlands and parts of the UK to cut rat running on residential streets -- are proposed as part as part of the proposals.

Residents from the Dublin 6 area are invited to a meeting on the proposed South Dublin Quietway this week as the organisers warned of “serious consequences” for residents.

Quiteways are a type of cycle route which mainly use quite roads and streets or streets which are traffic calmed when the routes are put in place.

The last meeting on the route was proceeded by the circulation of an anonymous leaflet with misinformation, including details of route options which were not recommended to be used. That meeting heard objections including claims that the quiteway would devalue property and infringe on one of the objector’s constitutional right to enjoy his property.

A seprate leaflet for the meeting this week which was distributed around Cowper Road area said: “This proposal may have serious consequences for you with traffic rerouting and road closures using BOLLARDS.”

The meeting is planned to take place this Wednesday evening at 7.30pm at the Mageough Home on Cowper Road.

The quietway was proposed by Cllr Paddy Smyth (Fine Gael), but the meeting on Wednesday seems to be organised people less convinced about the proposal.

I am editor of IrishCycle.com and have reported on and commented on cycling in Ireland for over a decade. My background is in journalism -- I have a BA in Journalism from DCU and HDip in Print Journalism from BCFE. I wrote about cycling for national newspapers, and then started CyclingInDublin.com for overflow stories. Later the website was re-branded to reflect a more national focus.

8 Comments

  1. Do you know if this is a public meeting. Can anyone go along on the day?

  2. It’s advertised as a public meeting with an invite at least to all Dublin 6 residents.

  3. So now your ability to drive your car wherever you want whenever you want is in the constitution? Who knew. Has anyone told Brown Thomas and their pals in the anti-pedestrian and anti-cyclist lobby? Seems like it would be a magic bullet.

    To address the less ridiculous claim…what evidence is there that house prices go down when through traffic is reduced? I would have thought the opposite would be the case.

    I’d be interested, although it seems that facts don’t impact groups like this at all.

  4. What’s the latest document on the proposals? The information about tomorrow’s meeting seems to have marked the filtered permeability in the wrong places e.g. top of Marlborough Rd (see https://t.co/mtnRiRvjZM)

    Does anyone have any links to concrete evidence that quietways increase house prices?

  5. I think the person making the claim that reducing traffic would negatively impact house prices should have to back that up. However here’s a study that shows houses on arterial streets have a 7.8% hit to their value compared to those on collector streets.
    https://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/IJHMA-12-2012-0062

    It is interesting that multi-residence buildings, presumably apartments, actually gain value if they are on main roads. I guess that this is because apartment residents are likely to be younger, less likely to have children who want to play outside and more likely to want easy access to public transport. I assume the road in question is mostly or entirely houses which would mean the claim that house prices will go down is wrong. I wonder if we’ll see “well all our houses will increase in value but my ability to drive where I want will be slightly curtailed so we need to vote against this!”.

    That was found after 30 seconds of research. I’m sure more studies can be found.

    I expect that would be shot down by objectors as not being an exact match for their specific situation while evidence free claims that house prices will go down are unchallenged.

  6. Excellent article by David O’Connor showing that house prices increase with this type on infrastructure.

    https://www.dublininquirer.com/2017/04/18/david-theres-clear-economic-value-urban-greenways/

  7. @Paddy Smyth
    Good article. Should be required reading for the self-serving types who use deeply cynical tactics and misinformation to undermine any positive initiative that doesn’t suit them and their own selfish agenda. We need to fight back against such people and show up their shameless lies for what they are.

  8. Bicycle lanes normally have a positive effect on house prices. A British study here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/509587/value-of-cycling.pdf and a more jazzy American version here https://atlanta.curbed.com/2013/8/8/10210634/bike-lanes-property-values-is-there-a-correlation – quote: “Vancouver saw a similar effect in 2010 with 65 percent of realtors using new bikeways as a selling feature on a home. Pittsburgh, whose bike lanes were added in 2007, found that bike lanes not only influenced residential real estate activity, but ignited commercial and business activity as well. And, in North Carolina, realtors found that 40 homes adjacent to the Shepherd’s Vineway Bikeway saw property increases of $5,000 and up.”

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