Do you support cycling in Dublin? Take 5 minutes to show it today

Take 5 minutes to support progress on cycling in Dublin

Please take 5 minutes to respond positively to the public consultation survey to trial a two-way cycle path on Strand Road in Sandymount — click here and then click on the survey link under the text “Give Us Your Views”.

Tell the council you support the trialling of the route and that there should be traffic calming in Sandymount village.

Do you have another few minutes?

Quickly sign the petition supporting the trail and traffic calming for the village.

The contact councillors telling them you want them to support the trial (the Dublin Cycling Campaign has a handy list of their email addresses here OR see the council’s official page for other contact details).

Is making Strand Road a road one-way road “too extreme”?

If we are to use the potential for cycling to make a difference in terms of tackling problems such as inactivity, air and noise pollution, and climate emissions then we need to take strong actions.

What about the claims that Sandymount village will get overrun with traffic?

The response from some residents is understandable but others are using fear as a tool to fight against change.

Traffic doesn’t work like this. David O’Connor, a lecturer at TU Dublin (formally DIT) explains the surprising impact of traffic restrictions here.

A more localised example is people claiming the status quote needs to be kept on Strand Road for access to Dublin Airport when it’s clear as day that people accessing the airport by car from south of Sandymount should be using the M50.

The idea that people driving to the airport from south Dublin would continue to use the village seems illogical, unless they were doing it to prove a point?

What about a cycle path in the village?

This is a suggestion by from what I can see one person locally and I’ve put his suggestion to other locals (who are outright objecting), and they start hemming and hawing about possible loss of parking or other affects in the village. The opposition is fired up and mainly looking for the status quo, not safer streets.

I am editor of IrishCycle.com and have reported on and commented on cycling in Ireland for over a decade. My background is in journalism -- I have a BA in Journalism from DCU and HDip in Print Journalism from BCFE. I wrote about cycling for national newspapers, and then started CyclingInDublin.com for overflow stories. Later the website was re-branded to reflect a more national focus.

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