Liffey Cycle Route backstreet detour “strongly opposed” by Dublin Cycling Campaign

— Liffey Cycle Route should live up to its name and stay beside the river says campaign 

Keeping the Liffey Cycle Route on Dublin’s quays will “unlock this congested and often dangerous route so that cycling works for families, leisure cycling, and commuters”, the Dublin Cycling Campaign has said in a submission sent to Dublin City Council in reply to the council’s latest plan.  

The campaign said: “The proposed Option 5 diversion, between Church St and Heuston, for the iconic Liffey Cycle Route is not an acceptable solution for cyclists, and downgrades the role of cycling as part of the transport solution for Dublin City.”

Hello... sorry to interrupt you: IrishCycle.com is reader-funded journalism supported by just over 250 readers like you -- they have subscribed for €5 per month or more. If you can, please join them and subscribe today. If you have already subscribed -- thank you! Now, back to the article...

“The proposed circuitous diversion away from the riverside (option 5) moves the route away from its pleasant setting, away from basic desire lines, and adds numerous extra junctions and conflict points between cycling and pedestrians and delivery vehicles. For these reasons this proposed design will not attract biking commuters and other bike users, will cause problems for cargo bike/delivery bike users and will do little to encourage newcomers to cycling. It will set a low bar, undermining future plans for cycling in Dublin,” the submission said.

It said: “Dublin Cycling Campaign maintains that the essence of an option with a full riverside cycle route and bus priority, and the relocation of the Croppies Acre down to the river is feasible, and the best option for Dublin City.”

It added that other options include one or more of a mix of the following: narrowing the proposed cycle route over a short distance, as happened on sections of the Grand Canal cycleway; merging main traffic lanes for a short section diverting pedestrians on to the building side of the North Quays for a section, enabling the use of the existing riverside pathway width; diverting general vehicular traffic along Benburb St for an agreed distance; or consideration of other possibilities, including new bridges across Liffey.

The group listed 18 reasons why the backstreet detour Option 5 from Phoenix Park to Church Street is a poor choice:

  1. Lack of buffer space between cycle route and general carriageway all along this off-river section of route.
  2. Badly designed linkages with existing Phoenix Park cycle tracks.
  3. Conflicts with the loading and parking bay at the Criminal Courts of Justice.
  4. Loss of scarce footpath width on the north side of Parkgate Street.
  5. Conflict with high demand for loading and parking on north side of Parkgate Street (see image below).
  6. Loss of priority at minor business entrances on Parkgate Street.
  7. Conflict with delivery and coach loading at the Aisling Hotel.
  8. Crossing the Luas tracks west of the Croppies Park at an inappropriate angle.
  9. Loss of a footpath behind the Civil Defence HQ and Croppy Acre Park.
  10. Conflicts with pedestrians at the Museum Luas stop.
  11. Poor linkages with the critical Heuston transport hub and Heuston South Quarter
  12. Conflict with apartment car park access on Benburb Street.
  13. Extra turning conflicts with vehicles on the shared Luas/carriageway sections.
  14. Loss of a busy newly constructed footpath at Smithfield pinch point.
  15. Dangerous cycle path design contrary to National Cycle Manual at Smithfield pinch point.
  16. Lack of linkages to Father Mathew Bridge.
  17. Loss of river frontage and directness of route
  18. Loss of an iconic statement by City on transport priorities for the future

SIGN THE PETITION: Save the Liffey Cycle Route: Keep it on the quays!

Hello Reader... IrishCycle.com is a reader-funded journalism publication. Effectively it's an online newspaper covering news and analyses of cycling and related issues, including cycle route designs, legal changes, and pollical and cultural issues.

There are examples, big and small, which show that the reader-funded or listener-funding model can work to support journalism -- from the Dublin Inquirer and The Guardian to many podcasts. To make it work for IrishCycle.com, it just needs enough people like you to believe!

Monthly subscriptions will give IrishCycle.com's journalism a dependable base of support. But please don't take free access for granted. Last year IrishCycle.com had an average of 15,800 readers per month and we know our readers include people who cycle and those who don't, politicians, officials and campaigners.

I know only a small percentage of readers will see the value of keeping this open enough to subscribe, that's the reality of the reader-funded model. But more support is needed to keep this show on the road.

The funding drive was started in November 2021 and, as of the start of February, 210 readers have kindly become monthly subscribers -- thank you very much to all that have!

But currently, it's only around 1.3% of readers who subscribe. So, if you can, please join them and subscribe today via ko-fi.com/irishcycle/tiers

Cian Ginty
Editor, IrishCycle.com

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.