IrishCycle.com is reader-funded journalism, but our subscription numbers have stalled at around 250 subscribers. 20 more subscribers by the end of August is the current target. Can you help? If you can, please subscribe today for €5 or more. If you have already done so -- thank you!

Campaigners call for support of Liffey Cycle Route this Sunday

— Cycle planned for this Sunday, September 10.

This is reader-funded journalism, but it needs more support -- our target is 20 more subscribers by the end of August... can you help? Subscribe today.

Anybody who wants to show their support for the proposed segregated Liffey Cycle Route are asked to cycle from the Phoenix Park to the Docklands this Sunday.

The cycle is ahead of the Dublin City Council transport committee meeting later this month which is expected to deal with choosing Option 7 which keeps the cycle route on the quays or Option 8 which diverts cycling into a boardwalk and add a number of conflicts with pedestrians. Campaigners are hoping Option 7 is chosen, but it will require diverting motorists off a section of the quays. 

The cycle of the quays, organised by the Dublin Cycling Campaign, begins at 11am at the Wellington Monument in the Phoenix Park and travels along the north quays to the  Samuel Beckett Bridge. The campaign said today that the cycle will be marshalled and supported by Garda Traffic Corps and Dublin Cycling Campaign marshals.

People will then be invited to cycle to Phibsborough for refreshments. Phizzfest and local residents groups in Phibsborough will host an “on-street celebration” with refreshments outside Bang Bang café on Leinster Street.
The campaign for the route has gained the support of Conal Keaney, a Dublin hurler and footballer, and business entrepreneur. He said: “This envisaged cycle route will make a major statement by Dublin City about a sustainable transport future for the City. The proposed segregated route from the Phoenix Park down along the historic spine of the River Liffey will be a great attraction, for commuters, leisure cyclists, and tourists alike, and has the power to transform this area of the City.”
Kieran Ryan of the Dublin Cycling Campaign said: “‘The latest CSO figures show that many short journeys that are presently made by car could easily be made by bicycle. Building routes such as this proposed Liffey Cycle Route will encourage commuters and travellers generally to leave the car behind and switch to a sustainable transport mode, and in turn help to reduce congestion. It could be a win-win situation.”

Hello Reader... IrishCycle.com is a reader-funded journalism publication. Effectively it's an online newspaper covering news and analyses of cycling and related issues, including cycle route designs, legal changes, and pollical and cultural issues.

There are examples, big and small, which show that the reader-funded or listener-funding model can work to support journalism -- from the Dublin Inquirer and The Guardian to many podcasts. To make it work for IrishCycle.com, it just needs enough people like you to believe!

Monthly subscriptions will give IrishCycle.com's journalism a dependable base of support. But please don't take free access for granted. Last year IrishCycle.com had an average of 15,800 readers per month and we know our readers include people who cycle and those who don't, politicians, officials and campaigners.

I know only a small percentage of readers will see the value of keeping this open enough to subscribe, that's the reality of the reader-funded model. But more support is needed to keep this show on the road.

The funding drive was started in November 2021 and, as of the start of June 2022, 250 readers have kindly become monthly subscribers -- thank you very much to all that have!

But currently, it's only around 1.6% of readers who subscribe. So, if you can, please join them and subscribe today via ko-fi.com/irishcycle/tiers

Cian Ginty
Editor, IrishCycle.com

1 comment

  1. Was that a parody post by BlackQueen?

    If it wasn’t, and if BlackQueen was actually serious, I’d just like to point out that a safe segregated cycle route will benefit everyone, not just people on bikes. Yes, that’s right – everyone, even people in cars and pedestrians.

    How can this be so? Well for starters, a safe segregated cycle route will result in a lot more people cycling and thus decreased demand for road space as many of those new cyclists will have previously have been in cars.

    A cycle route will also have benefits for pedestrians. How? Well, less cars means a safer environment and thus more people will feel like walking is a viable option. It means less pollution (>1.5K dead every year from traffic pollution in Ireland and tens of thousands of illnesses). It means less noise. It means less stress. It means healthy people in society as a whole which means less money needs to be paid for health costs.

    I could go on, but I hope you see the point.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.