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Trial a segregated cycle path on Dublin’s quays in 2020

We need your help to show public support to call on Dublin City Council, National Transport Authority, Minister for Transport to trial a cycle path on Dublin’s quays in 2020 and look at building a wider quick-build cycle network. Please sign and share the petition now at my.uplift.ie.

This is reader-funded journalism, but it needs more support -- our target is 20 more subscribers by the end of August... can you help? Subscribe today.

The Liffey Cycle Route was adopted in the Dublin City Development Plan 2011-2017 with the promise that a continuous and segregated cycle route would be built within the time of the plan. But the project has suffered many set backs and, last week, it was confirmed that the route is delayed yet again and now not expected to open until at least 2024.

Plans have been mulled for years to try to keep everybody happy. But an apparent solution made public in May 2019 includes removal of rows of trees, narrowing footpaths, interfering with historic bridge walls, and even the removal of some existing pedestrian crossings. And for what? The draft plans show a route which is not continuous, leaves people cycling exposed at junctions, and looks too narrow for current demand in cycling.

Often a lack of funding is given as a reason for delaying projects, but the Liffey Cycle Route has suffered an issue with “politics of space” — a fear of removing cars from parts of the quays despite international examples showing that this is the way to go.

This is as much about what kind of capital city Ireland wants as it is about cycling: A car-dominated city centre or enabling sustainable transport which is better for transport capacity, health, the local air quality, local residents, business, tourism and even climate change.

Cycling has increased in Dublin in the last decade but the creation of safe and attractive cycle routes has remained stalled long after economic recovery while at the same time extra lanes have been added to motorways near the city. We are asking that city and national authorities go back to the previous plan of continuous two-way cycle path on the quays — trial it for at least 8 months and then ask if people want to go back to the way things are now.

Please sign and share the petition now at my.uplift.ie.

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Please sign and share the petition now at https://my.uplift.ie/petitions/trial-a-cycle-path-on-dublin-s-quays-in-2020

Hello Reader... IrishCycle.com is a reader-funded journalism publication. Effectively it's an online newspaper covering news and analyses of cycling and related issues, including cycle route designs, legal changes, and pollical and cultural issues.

There are examples, big and small, which show that the reader-funded or listener-funding model can work to support journalism -- from the Dublin Inquirer and The Guardian to many podcasts. To make it work for IrishCycle.com, it just needs enough people like you to believe!

Monthly subscriptions will give IrishCycle.com's journalism a dependable base of support. But please don't take free access for granted. Last year IrishCycle.com had an average of 15,800 readers per month and we know our readers include people who cycle and those who don't, politicians, officials and campaigners.

I know only a small percentage of readers will see the value of keeping this open enough to subscribe, that's the reality of the reader-funded model. But more support is needed to keep this show on the road.

The funding drive was started in November 2021 and, as of the start of June 2022, 250 readers have kindly become monthly subscribers -- thank you very much to all that have!

But currently, it's only around 1.6% of readers who subscribe. So, if you can, please join them and subscribe today via ko-fi.com/irishcycle/tiers

Cian Ginty
Editor, IrishCycle.com

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