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Limerick walking and cycling groups start #WeNeedSpace campaign

— Walking and cycling groups call for reallocation of road space in Limerick City.

The reallocation of road space in Limerick City is required for social distancing during the current crisis, according to the Limerick Cycling Campaign, the Limerick Cycle Bus and the Irish Pedestrian Network. The two groups today launched their #WeNeedSpace campaign.

The groups have started a petition which seeks the following actions from Limerick City and County Council:

  1. “Reallocate road space to people walking and cycling – widen footpaths to 3 metres and introduce a circular segregated cycle route in and around the city encompassing either Shannon Bridge or Sarsfield Bridge using cones, bollards, planters and signage.”
  2. “Automate pedestrian signal crossings during daylight hours and increase pedestrian crossing times across the city.”
  3. “Temporarily lower speed limits to 30 kph in urban and suburban areas.”
  4. “Support a weekly Cyclovia event – where certain streets are closed off each Saturday to facilitate exercise and play whilst observing physical distancing.”

The groups said: “It’s very difficult for young families in the city to get fresh air and exercise while trips to parks and beaches are off-limits. We need to facilitate safe segregated cycle routes in the city to encourage family and more cautious cyclists to come out and get some exercise. A circular segregated cycle would open up the city to young people to get their exercise in a safe way.”

They added: “These temporary actions in response to the current emergency, would be strategic in creating a positive cultural change to make our towns and cities more liveable and contributing to a much needed boost in footfall required to aid the economic recovery when we move beyond the current crisis.”

 

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Cian Ginty
Editor, IrishCycle.com

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