Gate removed from Grand Canal Greenway “Good, but not enough” says man who was attacked

Here’s an image of the part of the gate which has been removed — it’s unclear at this point if the maintenance vehicle gate will be removed and replaced with bollards or not:

One of the people who were attacked at the gate, Yaman Umuroğlu, responding to the image said: “Good, but not enough. Still easy to ambush passers-by with that small opening. I wonder if Waterways Ireland did this? There used to be a lot of graffiti on the gate, it seems to have been cleaned.”

As this website reported at the time, last December,?Yaman was attacked at the gate and then his bicycle stolen.

Speaking to IrishCycle.com, he said: “I’m really no expert in how to keep people safe in cities, but the least that could be done would be to remove the rest of that gate, more than half of the width of the canal is still blocked, so it’s still a pinch point for ambushes, and then there’s the rest of the kissing gates along the canal.“

Yaman added: “How do you fix this, I do not know. CCTV cameras obviously don’t cut it. A combination of passive surveillance — just having more people there — combined with guards on patrol might help, but a better solution is to get to the root of the problem and fix it there. Why are these young lads hanging out on the canals and terrorizing people there?”

 

Here’s an image of the part of the gate which has been removed — it’s unclear at this point if the maintenance vehicle gate will be removed and replaced with bollards or not:

One of the people who were attacked at the gate, Yaman Umuroğlu, responding to the image said: “Good, but not enough. Still easy to ambush passers-by with that small opening. I wonder if Waterways Ireland did this? There used to be a lot of graffiti on the gate, it seems to have been cleaned.”

As this website reported at the time, last December,?Yaman was attacked at the gate and then his bicycle stolen.

Speaking to IrishCycle.com, he said: “I’m really no expert in how to keep people safe in cities, but the least that could be done would be to remove the rest of that gate, more than half of the width of the canal is still blocked, so it’s still a pinch point for ambushes, and then there’s the rest of the kissing gates along the canal.“

Yaman added: “How do you fix this, I do not know. CCTV cameras obviously don’t cut it. A combination of passive surveillance — just having more people there — combined with guards on patrol might help, but a better solution is to get to the root of the problem and fix it there. Why are these young lads hanging out on the canals and terrorizing people there?”

Dublin City Council has removed a “kissing gate” on its section of the Grand Canal Greenway at Bluebell, which has previously been an ambush point for attacking users of the cycle path and taking their bicycles.

At first it was unclear who removed the gate but it’s now been confirmed that it happened after councillors pushed for it:

 

Here’s an image of the part of the gate which has been removed — it’s unclear at this point if the maintenance vehicle gate will be removed and replaced with bollards or not:

One of the people who were attacked at the gate, Yaman Umuroğlu, responding to the image said: “Good, but not enough. Still easy to ambush passers-by with that small opening. I wonder if Waterways Ireland did this? There used to be a lot of graffiti on the gate, it seems to have been cleaned.”

As this website reported at the time, last December,?Yaman was attacked at the gate and then his bicycle stolen.

Speaking to IrishCycle.com, he said: “I’m really no expert in how to keep people safe in cities, but the least that could be done would be to remove the rest of that gate, more than half of the width of the canal is still blocked, so it’s still a pinch point for ambushes, and then there’s the rest of the kissing gates along the canal.“

Yaman added: “How do you fix this, I do not know. CCTV cameras obviously don’t cut it. A combination of passive surveillance — just having more people there — combined with guards on patrol might help, but a better solution is to get to the root of the problem and fix it there. Why are these young lads hanging out on the canals and terrorizing people there?”

Dublin City Council has removed a “kissing gate” on its section of the Grand Canal Greenway at Bluebell, which has previously been an ambush point for attacking users of the cycle path and taking their bicycles.

At first it was unclear who removed the gate but it’s now been confirmed that it happened after councillors pushed for it:

 

Here’s an image of the part of the gate which has been removed — it’s unclear at this point if the maintenance vehicle gate will be removed and replaced with bollards or not:

One of the people who were attacked at the gate, Yaman Umuroğlu, responding to the image said: “Good, but not enough. Still easy to ambush passers-by with that small opening. I wonder if Waterways Ireland did this? There used to be a lot of graffiti on the gate, it seems to have been cleaned.”

As this website reported at the time, last December,?Yaman was attacked at the gate and then his bicycle stolen.

Speaking to IrishCycle.com, he said: “I’m really no expert in how to keep people safe in cities, but the least that could be done would be to remove the rest of that gate, more than half of the width of the canal is still blocked, so it’s still a pinch point for ambushes, and then there’s the rest of the kissing gates along the canal.“

Yaman added: “How do you fix this, I do not know. CCTV cameras obviously don’t cut it. A combination of passive surveillance — just having more people there — combined with guards on patrol might help, but a better solution is to get to the root of the problem and fix it there. Why are these young lads hanging out on the canals and terrorizing people there?”

I am editor of IrishCycle.com and have reported on and commented on cycling in Ireland for over a decade. My background is in journalism -- I have a BA in Journalism from DCU and HDip in Print Journalism from BCFE. I wrote about cycling for national newspapers, and then started CyclingInDublin.com for overflow stories. Later the website was re-branded to reflect a more national focus.

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