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Dublin to get first retrofitted north-south segregated cycle route across Liffey

Dublin could soon be getting its first retrofitted north-south segregated cycle route across the River Liffey and first quick-build cycle route that crosses that northside/southside divide.

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A cycle route linking Queen Street to Bridgefoot Street could soon become a reality. It would likely be a quick-build route at first before more permanent features are installed.

It follows the development earlier this year of residents, businesses and councillors signing a letter calling on Dublin City Council to use temporary measures to try out wider footpaths Queen Street and a two-way cycle track on Queen Street, George’s Lane and Mellows Bridge.

The visuals provided in association with the letter included reducing Queen Street to one lane of traffic to provide not only a two-way cycle path but also extra street space for seating, tables outside business and greenery in one of Dublin’s most high-density areas. However, the Dublin City Council graphics shows Queen Street with two lanes of traffic remaining and just the cycle path.

The project has been allocated funding from the Government via the National Transport Authority.

Cllr Janet Horner and Cllr Michael Pidgeon tweeted out images yesterday and councillors expect to hear more details when they are briefed by council officials at a local area council meeting today.

https://twitter.com/Pidge/status/1369268344533221376

 

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Cian Ginty
Editor, IrishCycle.com

1 comment

  1. That lad on the bike in the video needs a serious service done on his bike. Also none of the people on bikes in the mock-up images are wearing masks. Tsk, tsk, you just know that the STC crowd and Mannix Flynn will be lodging legal objections to this.

    Reply

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