New east-west walking and cycle route to link Nutgrove to Dún Laoghaire

— Pre-design public consultation to seek community input before route is designed.
— ‘DLR Connector’ route to link Nutgrove Dundrum, Kilmacud, Stillorgan, St Augustine’s, Deansgrange, Monkstown, Dún Laoghaire areas.

Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council is launching pre-design public consultation on a new east-west walking and cycling route called the ‘DLR Connector’.

The route will include linking existing and already planned sections to sections that need upgrading. It will include for example Barton Road East, part of the Kilmacud Rd Upper, Kilmacud Rd Lower, Benamore Road and Monkstown Ave.

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IMAGE: Route outline map from Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council.

The consultation includes an online survey; an informational webinar on Wednesday December 8 accessed via filling out the survey; and a series of online and in-person neighbourhood-based workshops. Full details of the public consultations can be found at dlrcoco.ie.

Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council said: “In the interest of designing a high-quality scheme that is informed by the experience, knowledge and ideas of future users, the local community are being engaged at an early pre-design stage.”

The council added: “We hope to engage a diverse mix of stakeholders in the route area to hear their ideas and input, provide clear and transparent information, and incorporate feedback from community members into the design, wherever possible.”

Cllr Oisín O’Connor (Green Party) said: “The DLR Connector is an east-west project that connects people living from Marlay Park in Rathfarnham to the People’s Park in Dún Laoghaire. I’m really excited by the way this project is being run by engaging with local communities before the design work has even started.”

“It’s also fantastic to see the focus on public realm, junctions and roundabouts. Making our public space become less about moving cars isn’t just about making them more about moving people. These are places where people meet, sit for a rest, hold community events and more, not just transport corridors,” he said.

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