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Clonskeagh-Ranelagh-city centre cycle route not expected to be under construction until Q3 2024 at the earliest

Dublin City Council’s planned cycle route taking in Clonskeagh-Ranelagh-city centre cycle route is not expected to be under construction until Q3 2024 at the earliest.

The 3.1km route will include the roads and streets between Charlemont Street inside the Grand Canal in the city centre to Clonskeagh Bridge at the River Dodder.

The much-delayed project was previously supposed to start construction last year, in 2021. Plans have been in the works for the route since at least back to 2014, which means that the 3km project will be at least a decade in the works before construction starts.

South East Area councillors are tomorrow (Monday) to be briefed on the project at their local area committee planned for 2pm.

According to an indicative cross-section in the report to councillors, at least some of the route will include sub-standard 1.5 metre wide cycle paths, although the extend of this is unclear.

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Three options — one-way raised cycle tracks on both sides, one-way protected cycle lanes on both sides and a two-way cycle path on one side — were all brought forward to ‘High Level Impact Assessment’ to “scrutinise each option in greater detail, including assessment of: The geometric viability of each remaining option, with a view to achieving the optimal facility.”

The ‘Emerging Preferred Option’ is “one-way raised cycle track on both sides of the carriageway”.

The project is also to include 17 additional pedestrian crossings.

A report published in advance of the briefing shows the expected timeline:

Phase 2: Concept Development and Option Selection
• Q3 2022 – Complete options selection process
Phase 3: Preliminary Design
• Q3 2022 – Preliminary Design
Phase 4: Statutory Processes
• Q3/Q4 2022 – Section 38 (including non-statutory
consultation)
Phase 5: Detailed Design and Procurement
• Q4 2022 / Q3 2023 – Detailed Design (3 phases)
• Q4 2023 – Tender
Phase 6: Construction and Implementation
• Q3 2024 – Construction start (scheme to be implemented over several Phases)

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Cian Ginty
Editor, IrishCycle.com

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