Gardaí catch three motorists traveling 91-101km/h in 50 km/h zones as start-of year road deaths spike highest in a decade

— Highest number of deaths in the first two months of the year in a decade.

Three motorists were caught traveling between 91-101km/h in 50km/h zones — they were among those detected speeding on the latest National Slow Down Day, which ended this morning.

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The National Slow Down Day, which actually takes place a number of times a year, takes place as 38 people have been killed on Irish roads in the first 61 days of the year.

The number of people killed so-far this year is 38, which is six more than the same time last year. The deaths were the result of six extra fatal collisions compared to 2023, and an extra ten deaths compared to 2022.

Gardaí said that they and GoSafe vans recorded over 900 drivers speeding between 7am on Thursday, February 29th, to 7am on Friday, March 1st, 2024.

A Garda spokesperson said: “Gardaí arrested three drivers detected speeding on suspicion of dangerous driving, while a further three drivers detected speeding were subsequently arrested on suspicion of driving while intoxicated.”

The spokesperson added: “The aim of National Slow Down Day was to remind drivers of the dangers of speeding, to increase compliance with speed limits and act as a deterrent to driving at excessive or inappropriate speed. An Garda Síochána continues to appeal to drivers to comply with speed limits in order to reduce the number of speed related collisions, save lives and reduce injuries on our roads.”

They listed the following as “examples of motorists putting themselves and others at risk” and other examples listed yesterday included:

  • 101km/h in a 50km/h Zone in the Castlemaine area of Kerry
  • 97km/h in a 50km/h Zone in the Castleisland area of Kerry
  • 91km/h in a 50km/h Zone on the R510 Dock Road, Limerick
  • 87km/h in a 50km/h Zone on the R135 Coolshannagh, Monaghan
  • 70km/h in a 50km/h Zone on the Church Street Ballinasloe, Galway
  • 65km/h in a 50km/h Zone on the Pearse Road, Sligo Sligo
  • 108km/h in a 60km/h Zone in the Ballymun area of Dublin
  • 107km/h in a 60km/h Zone in the Athy area of Kildare
  • 104km/h in a 60km/h Zone in the Cappamore area of Limerick
  • 87km/h in a 60km/h Zone on the R750 Merrymeeting Rathnew Wicklow
  • 73km/h in a 60km/h Zone on the N59 Lecarrow Crossmolina Mayo
  • 129km/h in a 80km/h Zone in the Roosky area of Roscommon
  • 122km/h in a 80km/h Zone in the Órán Mór area of Galway
  • 115km/h in a 80km/h Zone on the N4 Palmerston Upper Dublin 22
  • 160km/h in a 100km/h Zone on the N7 Castlewarden South Kill Kildare
  • 152km/h in a 100km/h Zone in the Rathfarnham area of Dublin
  • 145km/h in a 100km/h Zone in the Barraduff area of Kerry
  • 174km/h in a 120km/h Zone in the Goresbridge area of Kilkenny
  • 172km/h in a 120km/h Zone in the Dundalk area of Louth
  • 165km/h in a 120km/h Zone in the Arklow area of Wicklow

IMAGE: Garda Press Office.


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2 comments

  1. Great to hear but I wonder how many 30kmph school zones especially were done as that’s the area we need to police

    Reply
    • Exactly, which is why I keep asking the Garda Traffic ‘X’ administrators to provide this data. Needless to say it is never forthcoming for the reason that they are reluctant to detect/enforce in 30 km/h zones.
      Why?
      [Shooting-fish-in-a-barrel comes to mind. #motordom again!]

      Reply

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