Constitution Hill gets protected cycle lanes under COVID-19 mobility plan

IMAGE: Examples protecting the existing cycle lanes on the Harold’s Cross route.

Dublin’s Constitution Hill is to get protected cycle lanes under COVID-19 mobility plan, according to the latest update report for the plan.

Dublin City Council, with funding from the Government via the National Transport Authority, is continuing to upgrade cycle lanes around the city — although the output of this work so-far is largely to add light segregation to existing narrow cycle lanes.

The latest Dublin City Council COVID-19 mobility plan update said: “Constitution Hill will be resurfaced by Road Maintenance over the coming weeks and once completed protected cycle tracks will be put in place along both sides with the road layout adjusted.” There are no details of the design available so-far.

The mobility plan update also said: “The Government stimulus package is funding a number of road resurfacing contracts and work is on-going to design new road layouts, including protected cycle-ways where appropriate, once the resurfacing works are complete.”

As the website reported last month: The €55m funding for pedestrian and cycling in the Jobs Stimulus package includes millions on general road resurfacing

The previously announced project to add protected cycle lanes on Griffith Avenue also continues, with the council seeking feedback on the design. The council is now focusing on a 500 metres section between St Mobhi Road and Walnut Rise.

The Griffith Avenue project was announced as part of the COVID mobility sub-heading of the School Mobility Programme. At the time, Dublin City Council said: “The aim of any intervention implemented will be to increase safety for children”, but the current design includes buses pulling across the cycle lane into the kerb.

IMAGE: Design of the latest section of the Griffith Avenue project.

IMAGE: Cross-section design for Griffith Avenue.

The update also includes mention of the Werburgh Street Cycle Route around Dublin Castle and the Parnell Square East contra-flow cycle track.

Last week the council confirmed that the trial of Sandymount cycle path is not postponed to 2021. The mobility plan update added to this, it said: “The public consultation process on the proposed scheme, which commenced on Friday 21 August finished on September 14. A total of 2,865 submissions were received of which 54% were in support, 27% opposed and a further 17% expressed concerns without either opposing
or supporting the scheme. Work is proceeding on the Merrion Road section link to the DLRCC boundary and this will be available on the consultation hub in the next week or so.”

It added: “A clarification was issued to the South East Area Committee on September 16 relating to Motion 15 which concerned the Strand Road scheme. As the motion was defeated the report no longer stands and it was confirmed that the COVID Mobility Team will revert to the Area Committee in October with a further report following review of the submissions received.”

Meanwhile the council is also looking to better enforce the existing Temple Bar pedestrian area. The update stated: “A number of flexible bollards are due to be placed in Temple Bar next week to enforce the existing pedestrian zones. These will be removed daily between 6am and 11am to allow access for deliveries. There is no change to the existing pedestrian hours in the area.”

 

I am editor of IrishCycle.com and have reported on and commented on cycling in Ireland for over a decade. My background is in journalism -- I have a BA in Journalism from DCU and HDip in Print Journalism from BCFE. I wrote about cycling for national newspapers, and then started CyclingInDublin.com for overflow stories. Later the website was re-branded to reflect a more national focus.

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